For the hobby enthusiast we carry everything needed for model building, trains, RC vehicles, rocketry, drones, and more. If you’re looking for outdoor games and activities to encourage the entire family to get out and play, explore our sports & outdoors store, where you’ll find ride-ons, play tents, playsets, Nerf blasters, flying toys and more. Here you can also find safety and sport-specific gear like helmets, shin guards, racquets, and basketballs.
Shopping at Gifts.com for online gifts makes it easy to stay in budget. Simply select from our price-sorted category pages and secure the best birthday gifts for an even better price. The perfect gifts cater to individual interests, so we offer a variety of personalized gifts that you can customize to express heartfelt sentiments at any time of the year. Let them know how special they are to you by inscribing their name on their favorite hobby item; from golf balls printed with your anniversary date to custom throws depicting the faces of your family, there are so many wonderful gift ideas that you may find it hard to settle on just one.
Outdoor ideas - Enjoy your time in the wilderness with Herrington's collection of outdoor tools, safety gear and emergency supplies. Choose solar powered lights, emergency radios, on-the-go chargers for your cell phone or handy water purifier gadgets to stay safe and in touch in any conditions. Read in bright sun without squinting with polarized magnifying sunglasses featuring built-in magnifying readers.

A distinction is often made between dolls and action figures, which are generally of plastic or semi-metallic construction and poseable to some extent, and often are merchandising from television shows or films which feature the characters. Modern action figures, such as Action Man, are often marketed towards boys, whereas dolls are often marketed towards girls.
Traditions within various cultures promote the passing down of certain toys to their children based on the child's gender. In South American Indian communities, boys receive a toy bow and arrow from their father while young girls receive a toy basket from their mother.[17] In North African and Saharan cultural communities, gender plays a role in the creation of self-made dolls. While female dolls are used to represent brides, mothers, and wives, male dolls are used to represent horsemen and warriors. This contrast stems from the various roles of men and women within the Saharan and North African communities. There are differences in the toys that are intended for girls and boys within various cultures, which is reflective of the differing roles of men and women within a specific cultural community.[18]
The STEM store features top rated learning and educational toys for all ages in science, technology, engineering and math genres. By filtering by ages from 2 – 4, 5 – 7, 8 – 13 and 14 & up, you can ensure your kid gets a toy that’s neither too challenging nor boring. These games will prepare and introduce your children to core subjects that give kids skills for future success in fields like robotics, computer science and natural sciences. If you’d like a new STEM toy delivered every month, visit our STEM Club subscription page where we’ll deliver STEM products monthly from brands like Osmo, Nintendo Labo, Learning Resources, and Fisher-Price.
"Age compression" is a toy industry term that describes the modern trend of children moving through play stages faster than they did in the past. Children have a desire to progress to more complex toys at a faster pace, girls in particular. Barbie dolls, for example, were once marketed to girls around 8 years old but have been found to be more popular in recent years with girls around 3 years old.[23] The packaging for the dolls labels them appropriate for ages 3 and up. Boys, in contrast, apparently enjoy toys and games over a longer timespan, gravitating towards toys that meet their interest in assembling and disassembling mechanical toys, and toys that "move fast and things that fight". An industry executive points out that girls have entered the "tween" phase by the time they are 8 years old and want non-traditional toys, whereas boys have been maintaining an interest in traditional toys until they are 12 years old, meaning the traditional toy industry holds onto their boy customers for 50% longer than their girl customers.[23]
During the Second World War, some new types of toys were created through accidental innovation. After trying to create a replacement for synthetic rubber, the American Earl L. Warrick inadvertently invented "nutty putty" during World War II. Later, Peter Hodgson recognized the potential as a childhood plaything and packaged it as Silly Putty. Similarly, Play-Doh was originally created as a wallpaper cleaner.[14] In 1943 Richard James was experimenting with springs as part of his military research when he saw one come loose and fall to the floor. He was intrigued by the way it flopped around on the floor. He spent two years fine-tuning the design to find the best gauge of steel and coil; the result was the Slinky, which went on to sell in stores throughout the United States.
Special occasions are a doddle with our gift ideas for her. Delight super-organised friend with pretty stationery and treat fashion-forward mums and sisters to a luxurious handbag from their favourite designer. Perfumed candles or diffusers are great for those who like to stay home or who have just moved into a new home. Looking to treat the both of you? Whisk her off on a camping adventure or enjoy tea for two with our experience day gifts.
This stereotypical attribution of sex-typical toys for girls and boys is gradually changing, with toys companies creating more gender neutral toys, as the benefits associated with allowing children to play with toys that appeal to them far outweighs controlling their individual preferences.[38] For example, many stores are beginning to change their gender labels on children's play items. Target removed all identification related to gender from their toy aisles and Disney did the same for their costumes.[26] The Disney store is an especially prevalent example of gender in play because they are a global identity in the toy world. A study done regarding their website found that though they have removed gender labels from their costumes, the toys online reflect more stereotypical gender identities. For example, males were associated with physicality and females were associated with beauty, housing, and caring.[39] Too, though they promote their toys as being for both genders, there is no section for boys and girls combined on their website. Those which are generally deemed for both genders more closely resemble what many would label "boy toys," as they relate closer to the stereotype of masculinity within play.[39]
DigiMuse Presents unveils the awarded projects from the inaugural DigiMuse Open Call that bring to life the possibilities of blending history, art and technology. Visitors can discover hidden stories and learn more about the fascinating artefacts at the National Museum of Singapore through a wide range of prototype projects. These include new experiences in immersive reality, dynamic conversations enabled by artificial intelligence, and many more!
Traditions within various cultures promote the passing down of certain toys to their children based on the child's gender. In South American Indian communities, boys receive a toy bow and arrow from their father while young girls receive a toy basket from their mother.[17] In North African and Saharan cultural communities, gender plays a role in the creation of self-made dolls. While female dolls are used to represent brides, mothers, and wives, male dolls are used to represent horsemen and warriors. This contrast stems from the various roles of men and women within the Saharan and North African communities. There are differences in the toys that are intended for girls and boys within various cultures, which is reflective of the differing roles of men and women within a specific cultural community.[18]
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The origin of toys is prehistoric; dolls representing infants, animals, and soldiers, as well as representations of tools used by adults are readily found at archaeological sites. The origin of the word "toy" is unknown, but it is believed that it was first used in the 14th century. Toys are mainly made for children.[1] The oldest known doll toy is thought to be 4,000 years old.[2]
Meccano was a model construction system that consisted of re-usable metal strips, plates, angle girders, wheels, axles and gears, with nuts and bolts to connect the pieces and enabled the building of working models and mechanical devices. Dinky Toys pioneered the manufacture of die-cast toys with the production of toy cars, trains and ships and model train sets became popular in the 1920s. The Britain's company revolutionized the production of toy soldiers with the invention of the process of hollow casting in lead in 1893[12] – the company's products remained the industry standard for many years.
Puzzles became greatly fashionable as well. In 1893, the English lawyer Angelo John Lewis, writing under the pseudonym of Professor Hoffman, wrote a book called Puzzles Old and New.[13] It contained, amongst other things, more than 40 descriptions of puzzles with secret opening mechanisms. This book grew into a reference work for puzzle games and was very popular at the time. The Tangram puzzle, originally from China, spread to Europe and America in the 19th century.

Toys became more widespread with the changing attitudes towards children engendered by the Enlightenment. Children began to be seen as people in and of themselves, as opposed to extensions of their household and that they had a right to flourish and enjoy their childhood. The variety and number of toys that were manufactured during the 18th century steadily rose; John Spilsbury invented the first jigsaw puzzle in 1767 to help children learn geography. He created puzzles on eight themes – the World, Europe, Asia, Africa, America, England and Wales, Ireland and Scotland. The rocking horse (on bow rockers) was developed at the same time in England, especially with the wealthy as it was thought to develop children's balance for riding real horses.[7]
Puzzles became greatly fashionable as well. In 1893, the English lawyer Angelo John Lewis, writing under the pseudonym of Professor Hoffman, wrote a book called Puzzles Old and New.[13] It contained, amongst other things, more than 40 descriptions of puzzles with secret opening mechanisms. This book grew into a reference work for puzzle games and was very popular at the time. The Tangram puzzle, originally from China, spread to Europe and America in the 19th century.
The earliest toys are made from materials found in nature, such as rocks, sticks, and clay. Thousands of years ago, Egyptian children played with dolls that had wigs and movable limbs which were made from stone, pottery, and wood.[4] In Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, children played with dolls made of wax or terracotta, sticks, bows and arrows, and yo-yos. When Greek children, especially girls, came of age it was customary for them to sacrifice the toys of their childhood to the gods. On the eve of their wedding, young girls around fourteen would offer their dolls in a temple as a rite of passage into adulthood.[5][6]
The STEM store features top rated learning and educational toys for all ages in science, technology, engineering and math genres. By filtering by ages from 2 – 4, 5 – 7, 8 – 13 and 14 & up, you can ensure your kid gets a toy that’s neither too challenging nor boring. These games will prepare and introduce your children to core subjects that give kids skills for future success in fields like robotics, computer science and natural sciences. If you’d like a new STEM toy delivered every month, visit our STEM Club subscription page where we’ll deliver STEM products monthly from brands like Osmo, Nintendo Labo, Learning Resources, and Fisher-Price.
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