Toys became more widespread with the changing attitudes towards children engendered by the Enlightenment. Children began to be seen as people in and of themselves, as opposed to extensions of their household and that they had a right to flourish and enjoy their childhood. The variety and number of toys that were manufactured during the 18th century steadily rose; John Spilsbury invented the first jigsaw puzzle in 1767 to help children learn geography. He created puzzles on eight themes – the World, Europe, Asia, Africa, America, England and Wales, Ireland and Scotland. The rocking horse (on bow rockers) was developed at the same time in England, especially with the wealthy as it was thought to develop children's balance for riding real horses.[7]
In addition, children from differing communities may treat their toys in different ways based on their cultural practices. Children in more affluent communities may tend to be possessive of their toys, while children from poorer communities may be more willing to share and interact more with other children. The importance the child places on possession is dictated by the values in place within the community that the children observe on a daily basis.[19]
During the Second World War, some new types of toys were created through accidental innovation. After trying to create a replacement for synthetic rubber, the American Earl L. Warrick inadvertently invented "nutty putty" during World War II. Later, Peter Hodgson recognized the potential as a childhood plaything and packaged it as Silly Putty. Similarly, Play-Doh was originally created as a wallpaper cleaner.[14] In 1943 Richard James was experimenting with springs as part of his military research when he saw one come loose and fall to the floor. He was intrigued by the way it flopped around on the floor. He spent two years fine-tuning the design to find the best gauge of steel and coil; the result was the Slinky, which went on to sell in stores throughout the United States.

More complex mechanical and optics-based toys were also invented. Carpenter and Westley began to mass-produce the kaleidoscope, invented by Sir David Brewster in 1817, and had sold over 200,000 items within three months in London and Paris. The company was also able to mass-produce magic lanterns for use in phantasmagoria and galanty shows, by developing a method of mass production using a copper plate printing process. Popular imagery on the lanterns included royalty, flora and fauna, and geographical/man-made structures from around the world.[10] The modern zoetrope was invented in 1833 by British mathematician William George Horner and was popularized in the 1860s.[11] Wood and porcelain dolls in miniature doll houses were popular with middle class girls, while boys played with marbles and toy trains.
From the high-energy, Balkan party-atmosphere of Goran Bregovic Wedding and Funeral Band to the intimate and personal Anoushka Shankar, our BD&P World Music series shines with talent from around the world. In our TD Jazz season, we ignite the stage with every style of jazz, from the hip-hop vibe of José James (channeling Bill Withers) to traditional jazz legend David Sanborn. National Geographic Live features conservationists, anthropologists, and astrobiologists, ready to share their inspiring stories and stunning photography with you. PCL Blues brings another season of some of the best voices in blues today, including Duke Robillard, Dom Flemons, and the Queen of Detroit’s Blues, Thornetta Davis. Finally, Classic Albums Live delivers a healthy dose of nostalgia with Suptertramp’s Crime of the Century, Led Zeppelin IV, and AC/DC’s Back in Black.
Our games & puzzles store showcases the latest in specialty board games, card games, and puzzles from brands like Exploding Kittens, Card Against Humanity, Ravensburger, Catan, Spin Master, Nintendo, and classic games from Hasbro like Monopoly, Jenga, and Twister. We also carry essentials for the entire family like jigsaw puzzles, floor puzzles, chess, checkers, and playing cards.

* Financing available is "Equal payments, no interest" for 24 months (unless otherwise stated) and is only available on request, on approved credit and on purchases of $200 or more (excluding gift cards) made with your Triangle credit card at Canadian Tire, Sport Chek and participating Marks and Atmosphere locations. Interest does not accrue during the period of the plan. However, if we do not receive the full minimum due on a statement within 59 days of the date of that statement, or any event of default (other than a payment default) occurs under your Cardmember Agreement, all special payment plans on your account will terminate and (i) you will then be charged interest on the balances outstanding on such plans at the applicable regular annual rate from the day after the date of your next statement, and (ii) the balances outstanding will form part of the balance due on that statement. There is no administration fee charged for entering into a special payments plan. Each month during an equal payments plan you are required to pay in full by the due date that month’s equal payments plan instalment. Any unpaid portion not received by the due date will no longer form part of the equal payments plan and interest will accrue on that amount from the day after the date of your next statement at the applicable regular annual rate.
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